Cross Stitch Lingo 101

I had actually taken a break from counted cross stitch for a couple of years when I lost my sewing bug. The previous winter season, my sister-in-law assisted me to reignite that fire and we began sharing photos of our current sewing projects.

Prepared to discover some brand-new terminology? Here we go.

FO – Finished Object

FFO – Fully Finished Object

WIP – Work In Progress

BAP – Big Ass Project

LNS – Local Needlework Shop

SAL – Stitch Along. This happens in person or virtually!

ORT – Old Remaining Threads

FROG – When you have to rip out something sewed improperly. RIPIT RIPIT

Stitchy Mail– Getting fantastic plans in the mail which contain just sewing products. I right away take a photo and send out to my child and SIL. They comprehend the thrill.

Needle-minder– cool little pin/button with a magnet on it’s back that you can connect to your material and lay your needle on while not sewing. Whoever at first developed this concept is a genius!

Project bags – sewn by other stitchers these bags can have a clear plastic front allowing you to see your current stitching project. I keep my pattern, floss, material, scissors, beeswax and anything else for the existing project in one. You can’t get simply one. I believe I need to discover how to stitch one.
The two photos below are from:

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Coffee/Tea dyeing fabric – WHAT?! Yes, it’s an amazing way to make your fabric look older and there are tons of tutorials on YouTube. I learned from watching TheRealHousewivesofCrossStitch Flosstube.

Flosstube – A group of stitchers that publish videos on YouTube about their jobs, item evaluations, sew along and other crafts they are working on, books they like, you call it. Numerous of the sewing pattern designers likewise publish videos.
There you have it. A peek into an entire brand-new language for those people who get thrilled upon finding out about small needles (John James size 28 small are my brand-new preferred, see image listed below) while developing gorgeous artworks with a needle, thread, fabric, and distinct finishings.

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Until next time, keep that needle moving!

One thought on “Cross Stitch Lingo 101

  1. You really undid my life…lol. I am a copier of embroidery art. I like I copy it. Never really learned what name of stiches I did. Beautiful but knowledge of what was being done was missing. I halt not all projects till I learn, thanks to you, all I need. Please accept my thanks and I hope to soon go back and explain with words my art. Not just hand it over and not say a word of piece I’m proud to have done. Again thank you.

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